Pittsburgh building that houses city inspectors called unsafe

A city-owned building is classified as unsafe, even if the city still has employees working there. These employees include city building inspectors. Action News Investigates: Watch the report in the video player above. brick and torn plaster, but the biggest safety issues are not easy to see. “After making ‘hundreds of repairs,’ the memo says, the maintenance contractor ‘will no longer be servicing the equipment due to unsafe working conditions.'” Hornstein, the city’s director of public works While many employees have moved to another office or are working from home, several dozen are still there.One employee told Action News Investigates that they are required to work in construction even if they have respiratory problems. Hornstein said the city did not conduct air quality testing inside the building.He said he was not concerned that employees were breathing in toxic air. City of Pittsburgh has conducted air quality testing, but only in its workspace. The Housing Authority area is safe at this time,” said James Harris, the authority’s general counsel. city ​​area includes the Department nt of permits, licenses and inspections, as well as the headquarters of the fire bureau. the inspectors are in a building that could be potentially dangerous. This sentiment was also noted by several landowners who showed up at the Robin building in an unsuccessful attempt to obtain building permits. “Typical hypocrisy, isn’t it?” They walk around telling you your building isn’t safe or whatever and they can’t keep their own stuff under control,” said Marc Brands, a landowner. “I guess they would better pay for their insurance when everyone starts saying they’re getting asbestosis,” said owner Jim Zikesh. Last month, the city cited itself, but not for the conditions inside the building. The citation was about a dangerous sidewalk outside. The city and the housing authority hope to move all their employees to a newly renovated building on Boulevard des Alliés by November. The URA has already moved into this building.

A city-owned building is classified as unsafe, even if the city still has employees working there. These employees include the city’s building inspectors.

Action News Investigates: Watch the report in the video player above.

The 115-year-old Robin Civic Building once housed Jones & Laughlin Steel, but for years has been in decline.

Signs of deterioration include crumbling bricks and torn plaster, but the biggest safety issues aren’t easily visible.

In May, the building manager sent a memo to the city saying, “The condition of the heating system has created an unsafe condition in the building for tenants and contractors.

After making “hundreds of repairs,” the memo says, the maintenance contractor “will no longer service the equipment due to unsafe working conditions.”

“That tells me the heating and ventilation system isn’t in top shape,” said Chris Hornstein, the city’s director of public works.

While many employees have moved to another office or are working from home, several dozen are still there.

An employee told Action News Investigates he had to work in the building even though he had breathing problems.

Hornstein said the city did not perform air quality testing inside the building. He said he was not worried about employees breathing in toxic air.

The City of Pittsburgh Housing Authority conducted air quality testing, but only in its workspace.

“We haven’t been to the URA or the city area, but the Housing Authority area is safe at this time,” said James Harris, the authority’s general counsel.

The city area includes the Department of Permits, Licensing, and Inspections, as well as the headquarters of the Bureau of Fires.

Hornstein said it was “somewhat ironic” that city inspectors were in a building that could be potentially dangerous.

This sentiment was also noted by several landowners who showed up at the Robin building in an unsuccessful attempt to obtain building permits.

“Typical hypocrisy, isn’t it? They walk around telling you your building isn’t safe or whatever and they can’t keep their own stuff under control,” said Marc Brands, a landlord.

“I guess they better pay their insurance when everyone starts saying they get asbestosis,” owner Jim Zikesh said.

Last month, the city cited itself, but not for the conditions inside the building. The citation was about a dangerous sidewalk outside.

The city and the housing authority hope to move all their employees to a newly renovated building on Boulevard des Alliés by November. The URA has already moved into this building.

About admin

Check Also

China’s real estate woes deepen in August as prices, sales and investment tumble

Join now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register New home prices fall at fastest …